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Sound and Fury: ‘The Dark Knight Rises’ Against Theme and Story
By Christopher Sebela
Each of Christopher Nolan’s Batman films opens with a quiet, singular image forming the unmistakeable bat symbol. They’re cinematic palate cleansers before the business of Batman begins in earnest. In Batman Begins, it is a sky full of bats; in The Dark Knight, it is a wall of flames; but the opening image of The Dark Knight Rises is notable for two reasons: the bat symbol appearing from cracking ice is muddy, only there if you look for it, and it is overlaid with the film’s opening lines of dialogue. If you wanted to, you could say that the first ten seconds of The Dark Knight Rises spell out all the problems that lay ahead: here is a film both rushed and obscured.SPOILER WARNING: The following contains massive spoilers for The Dark Knight Rises.Read More.

These are just some of the problems I had with the film.

comicsalliance:

Sound and Fury: ‘The Dark Knight Rises’ Against Theme and Story

By Christopher Sebela

Each of Christopher Nolan’s Batman films opens with a quiet, singular image forming the unmistakeable bat symbol. They’re cinematic palate cleansers before the business of Batman begins in earnest. In Batman Begins, it is a sky full of bats; in The Dark Knight, it is a wall of flames; but the opening image of The Dark Knight Rises is notable for two reasons: the bat symbol appearing from cracking ice is muddy, only there if you look for it, and it is overlaid with the film’s opening lines of dialogue. If you wanted to, you could say that the first ten seconds of The Dark Knight Rises spell out all the problems that lay ahead: here is a film both rushed and obscured.

SPOILER WARNING: The following contains massive spoilers for The Dark Knight Rises.

Read More.

These are just some of the problems I had with the film.

I can’t believe people aren’t more up-in-arms about the whitewashing in Nolan’s Batman movies. Everyone seems to hate on the Avatar movie and Prince of Persia and other movies, but Nolan did it in his movies too. Four out of the five non-white characters were cast with white actors! That’s pretty bad. And not only were the actors white, but Nolan didn’t even pretend to give them their proper ethnic backgrounds/histories, or have them do the proper accents or anything. And what’s even worse is that the actor who played Bane actually did fake an accent, but instead of a Hispanic accent it was some weird Austrian thing.

The only reason I can think that Nolan would do this, is that he’s completely ignorant (not probable), he’s racist (whether he acknowledges it or not), or he thought having four PoC villains would be worse than not having any PoC characters at all. What do you think?

To my PoC followers: would you rather he whitewash the characters if the alternative means the majority of the ethnic characters are villains?