the42towels

Something important to remember about comics

prynnette:

Comic fans, especially comic historians, and especially those focusing on Marvel characters, love to talk about the revolution that was “relatable” superheroes. Guys like Spidey, the Hulk, Daredevil, even Batman, who can’t escape relationship issues, insecurity, and/or teen angst despite their powers and gadgets. It’s a great point to make. Troubled heroes made Marvel, and subsequently, the modern superhero landscape, what it is today. It was a tremendous revolution in storytelling, a reflection of mid-century youth culture, and the force behind a lot of legendary comics. It’s something everyone who cares about comics history (and really, comics’ present and future) has to understand and respect.

But it also needs to be said that that the “revolution” was for men. Male characters struggled with work, family, trauma, high-minded notions of good and evil, villains who shook them to their core and left them more fully-realized. Male characters got to grow and change and embed themselves within the American, and eventually, the global imagination. Male characters brought Marvel success and glory and recognition as a forward-thinking “house of ideas.” Male characters got to have dimension and pathos and command over their own stories. Peter Parker struggled with love and loss and social responsibility. Gwen Stacy was pretty, and then she was dead.

I respect what Marvel did with the “relatable superhero.” I know that many of the comics I love most wouldn’t exist without that innovation, and many of those requisite girlfriend characters—especially Mary Jane—are among my favorite characters now. But I’m tired of uncritical celebration of an era that excluded me. I wasn’t worthy of a character to relate to. I was only there to be the girlfriend. And I need comics fans and historians to remember that.

creepingmonsterism

I seem to be the victim of some misquoting tonight

allofthefeelings:

brianmichaelbendis:

When you take off the last two lines of what I said you change the entirety of what I said…  you are misquoting me.

I took down my original post about Goyer because I realized I don’t want any part of any of this. I don’t know any of the people involved and I don’t know the context in which any of this was said but I do not appreciate being misquoted or thrown under a bus I had nothing to do with.

 my thoughts and feelings about misogyny and sexism in this business and in this culture are widely known. 

http://www.vulture.com/2014/04/comics-brian-michael-bendis-spider-man-guardians-x-men.html

RRRRRRRGGGG!!!

Aw, Bendis, no.

Being an ally isn’t just about statements. We all know that you want to be one of the good guys, that you love your daughters, that you want women to feel comfortable in the comics community. And we appreciate that. But as I’m sure you know, being an ally isn’t just statements; it’s also actions. And inevitably, being an ally involves sometimes fucking up, and then owning it and doing better next time.

I haven’t seen the misquoting- I wasn’t aware, and remain unconvinced, that it’s possible to change a reply in a reblog. But I have seen what’s going around, because it’s all over my dash. This time, you fucked up, and we need you to move on to the next part of the equation.

As other people have far more eloquently said, this isn’t just a case of a fan saying something dumb. A person in a position of power- and while anyone involved in the inner workings of Marvel or DC is seen as someone with more power than the lowly fans, this someone who is personally involved in the first Wonder Woman film appearance and thus should be conscious of the feminist expectations already on him- said something that is demeaning to women, a group of fans who already feel marginalized by the community, and in doing so, implicitly made other members of the community feel like it’s something that’s okay to say.

This may not be your intention, but when you say that he’s just another person and he has the right to say it and why are we giving him so much attention for a stupid comment, you may be trying to minimize what he said as unimportant, but what we hear is another person saying “your concerns aren’t valid, and what’s not important is how women are perceived in this space.”

Precisely because, as you say, your thoughts and feelings about misogyny and sexism in the business and culture of comics are so well known, is why it’s hurtful when we see you don’t have a dog in this fight. Because, as someone who wants to make this space feel safe for women, you SHOULD have a dog in this fight, and because we know you’re an ally and you identify as such, we expect you to know that this isn’t just silliness. Dismissing an accomplished lawyer superhero as a glorified sock for her cousin to jerk off into isn’t just a dumb fan comment; it’s a statement from a person in a position of power that implicitly tells women that no matter what we do, we will always be seen as object rather than subject in this community.

Part of being an ally is hearing the people calling you out and acknowledging that they aren’t wrong. Please be the ally we know you want to be.

upallnightogetloki
msjayjustice:

One of the many comments on this post. Once The Mary Sue and Wil Wheaton reblogged it I had to accept the fact that I probably will not be able to reply to all of the comments. But this one I especially wanted to respond to.
Respectfully, I disagree. True, it is a problem that there are fewer black characters than white characters. But it is not THE problem. The problem is white supremacy. A lack of representation is a symptom of the problem.There are loads of black characters that are out of continuity due to editorial decisions (in comics specifically) and why is that? Because representation wasn’t a priority. We’re lucky if it’s even a consideration, because we don’t have enough creators of color at the big comic book companies. There are many MANY black characters in independent comics by black creators that don’t get enough exposure. If you want to see them you’ll have to seek them out. Go to the Artist Alley at conventions and buy their creator owned books. Support them.In cosplay specifically, many black cosplayers will tell you that even when we cosplay black characters, we STILL get racist remarks. We get told we are too dark for Storm, that our hair is too nappy for Nubia, that our noses are too big, that we shouldn’t cosplay period. When we do characters with body paint, completely obscuring our skin, we get asked why this character has ‘negroid features.’ Any aspect of blackness is shunned and looked down upon, even when we accept the crumbs we’re given and cosplay the few characters we think are ‘safe’.So no, the problem is not that there are barely any black characters to cosplay. The problem is that black people are seen as less than equal. The problem is that people think it’s okay to say derogatory things about us in the name of ‘accuracy’. They think maintaining a mostly white group of characters, a remnant of a time where black people were property or sharecroppers who weren’t allowed to read, is more important that simply accepting that the world is multicultural and that our media should reflect that.

msjayjustice:

One of the many comments on this post. Once The Mary Sue and Wil Wheaton reblogged it I had to accept the fact that I probably will not be able to reply to all of the comments. But this one I especially wanted to respond to.

Respectfully, I disagree. True, it is a problem that there are fewer black characters than white characters. But it is not THE problem. The problem is white supremacy. A lack of representation is a symptom of the problem.

There are loads of black characters that are out of continuity due to editorial decisions (in comics specifically) and why is that? Because representation wasn’t a priority. We’re lucky if it’s even a consideration, because we don’t have enough creators of color at the big comic book companies.

There are many MANY black characters in independent comics by black creators that don’t get enough exposure. If you want to see them you’ll have to seek them out. Go to the Artist Alley at conventions and buy their creator owned books. Support them.

In cosplay specifically, many black cosplayers will tell you that even when we cosplay black characters, we STILL get racist remarks. We get told we are too dark for Storm, that our hair is too nappy for Nubia, that our noses are too big, that we shouldn’t cosplay period. When we do characters with body paint, completely obscuring our skin, we get asked why this character has ‘negroid features.’ Any aspect of blackness is shunned and looked down upon, even when we accept the crumbs we’re given and cosplay the few characters we think are ‘safe’.

So no, the problem is not that there are barely any black characters to cosplay. The problem is that black people are seen as less than equal. The problem is that people think it’s okay to say derogatory things about us in the name of ‘accuracy’. They think maintaining a mostly white group of characters, a remnant of a time where black people were property or sharecroppers who weren’t allowed to read, is more important that simply accepting that the world is multicultural and that our media should reflect that.

Thanks to my library, in the last three weeks I’ve read:

  • Captain America: Winter Soldier, Vol. 1 & 2
  • Captain America: Red Menace, Vol. 1& 2
  • Captain America: Civil War
  • The Death of Captain America, Vol. 1: The Death of the Dream
  • The Death of Captain America, Vol. 2: The Burden of Dreams
  • The Death of Captain America, Vol. 3: The Man Who Bought America
  • Captain America: The Man with No Face
  • Captain America: Road to Reborn
  • Captain America: Reborn
  • Captain America: Two Americas
  • Captain America: No Escape
  • Captain America: The Trial of Captain America
  • Captain America: Prisoner of War
  • Captain America and Black Widow
  • Winter Soldier: The Longest Winter
  • Winter Soldier: Broken Arrow
  • Winter Soldier: Black Widow Hunt
  • Winter Soldier: The Electric Ghost

I love you, library. 

dcwomenkickingass

New Comics Reader Are Increasingly Female; Not Reading Traditional Comics Coverage

dcwomenkickingass:

Four years ago when I posted an image from Batgirl and launched this blog, I really did believe there was a way to expand the reach of comics and bring in more readers who want to read about female characters and work by female creators. And from the very beginning my theory was that traditional comics media was a echo chamber that were mostly not very friendly places for female readers.

So from the very start of this blog I suggest that comics grow by looking outside the traditional ways to gain new female readers. I wrote about it.  And wrote about it. And wrote about it.

But nothing changed. 

But now … perhaps it will.

Read More

comixology
comixology:

Unless you’ve been living under a rock or have been frozen in a block of ice for the past couple months, you’ve probably heard a bunch about this Captain America guy, and hey, we get it, comics can be a treacherous world to navigate so we’re here to make it a bit easier for you with a comiXology Guide to Getting Started with Captain America!
Cap has had a long glorious run of protecting the American Way, but it all had to start somewhere, and way back in 1941 (that’s even before Tumblr existed!) Nazis were rolling through Europe and freedom as we know it was being threatened. Joe Simon & Jack Kirby saw the need for a new American Hero and thus Captain America was born, making his first appearance in the now iconic cover of Captain America Comics #1. This comic has the beginning of all that is Cap: The Super Soldier Program, Bucky, and the first appearance of The Red Skull (who is sporting a hell of a sweatsuit…)
Click here to read Captain America Comics #1
Stan Lee, also with Jack Kirby, put his classic style into a retelling of Steve Rogers transformation into the First Avenger in Captain America #109
Click here to read Captain America #109
In what is now seen as the essential Captain America run, Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting brought Cap up to present time. If there is one Captain America story you are going to read this is the one. ALSO ITS ON SALE RIGHT NOW SO GOOOO!
Click here to read the first volume of the Brubaker/Epting run
And if you’re really just more of the type of person who wants the newest thing, Rick Remender has helmed the Captain America ship and brought along his unique sci-fi stylings. See how Steve Rogers fares when he is transported as far away from the good ol’ U.S. of A. as he has ever been before with Captain America: Castaway in Dimension Z. THIS IS ALSO ON SALE RIGHT NOW HOLY COW THIS IS AN INSANE COINCIDENCE!
Click here to read the first volume of the Remender/John Romita Jr. run
That should give you a good jumping off point for all things Cap! Enjoy!

comixology:

Unless you’ve been living under a rock or have been frozen in a block of ice for the past couple months, you’ve probably heard a bunch about this Captain America guy, and hey, we get it, comics can be a treacherous world to navigate so we’re here to make it a bit easier for you with a comiXology Guide to Getting Started with Captain America!

Cap has had a long glorious run of protecting the American Way, but it all had to start somewhere, and way back in 1941 (that’s even before Tumblr existed!) Nazis were rolling through Europe and freedom as we know it was being threatened. Joe Simon & Jack Kirby saw the need for a new American Hero and thus Captain America was born, making his first appearance in the now iconic cover of Captain America Comics #1. This comic has the beginning of all that is Cap: The Super Soldier Program, Bucky, and the first appearance of The Red Skull (who is sporting a hell of a sweatsuit…)

Stan Lee, also with Jack Kirby, put his classic style into a retelling of Steve Rogers transformation into the First Avenger in Captain America #109

In what is now seen as the essential Captain America run, Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting brought Cap up to present time. If there is one Captain America story you are going to read this is the one. ALSO ITS ON SALE RIGHT NOW SO GOOOO!

And if you’re really just more of the type of person who wants the newest thing, Rick Remender has helmed the Captain America ship and brought along his unique sci-fi stylings. See how Steve Rogers fares when he is transported as far away from the good ol’ U.S. of A. as he has ever been before with Captain America: Castaway in Dimension Z. THIS IS ALSO ON SALE RIGHT NOW HOLY COW THIS IS AN INSANE COINCIDENCE!

That should give you a good jumping off point for all things Cap! Enjoy!

creepingmonsterism
wondygirl:

darkknightjrk:

deusexignis:

This is a masterpost for anyone who is interested in the Guardians of the Galaxy and isn’t sure where to start or what to read. I’ve compiled a masterpost based on the reading list by marveloki. The masterpost is arranged in correct reading order, but please feel free to consult marveloki’s reading list if you’re still having trouble figuring out what to read next.
The Guardians of the Galaxy team roster in these titles includes: Drax the Destroyer, Gamora, Adam Warlock, Quasar, Rocket Raccoon, Groot, Star-Lord, Mantis, Moondragon, Major Victory, Bug, Jack Flag, and Cosmo the Spacedog. Many of these characters will be appearing in Marvel’s upcoming GotG movie, so if you’re interested in learning more about them this is certainly a good place to start.
Comics List:
Annihilation: Conquest - Read the Prologue, then the Starlord stuff, and then just plain old Annihilation Conquest.
Guardians of the Galaxy #1-25 (2008)
The Thanos Imperative - Read the main run and then Devastation.
Annihilators/Annihilators: Earthfall - Read Annihilators first.
Happy reading!

That GOTG run is something that I’ve definitely been meaning to get into, and I think I’ll start to now…

Here’s an alternate reading guide with some added stuff and more links (courtesy of /co/) in case you guys really get into Cosmic Marvel. Last time I checked most of these stuff were hard to come by (there are very few trades that are up for sale and they are expensive) so when you have the money and the means and Marvel re-releases them or makes them available please buy them.I highly rec the Nova stuff with Richard Rider since it kind of goes hand to hand with the stuff that happens in GotG and it also leads to Thanos Imperative (and then move on to Sam’s stuff when you’re done with it!) not to mention the Nova corps is in the movie.Personally I didn’t really like Annihilators/Annihilators: Earthfall, IMO it’s only worth it because there’s a Rocket/Groot mini in there but other than that it wasn’t that great (and TBH it is very skippable).

I know next to nothing about GotG, so I’ll be reading all of this before the movie comes out.

wondygirl:

darkknightjrk:

deusexignis:

This is a masterpost for anyone who is interested in the Guardians of the Galaxy and isn’t sure where to start or what to read. I’ve compiled a masterpost based on the reading list by marveloki. The masterpost is arranged in correct reading order, but please feel free to consult marveloki’s reading list if you’re still having trouble figuring out what to read next.

The Guardians of the Galaxy team roster in these titles includes: Drax the Destroyer, Gamora, Adam Warlock, Quasar, Rocket Raccoon, Groot, Star-Lord, Mantis, Moondragon, Major Victory, Bug, Jack Flag, and Cosmo the Spacedog. Many of these characters will be appearing in Marvel’s upcoming GotG movie, so if you’re interested in learning more about them this is certainly a good place to start.

Comics List:

Happy reading!

That GOTG run is something that I’ve definitely been meaning to get into, and I think I’ll start to now…

Here’s an alternate reading guide with some added stuff and more links (courtesy of /co/) in case you guys really get into Cosmic Marvel. Last time I checked most of these stuff were hard to come by (there are very few trades that are up for sale and they are expensive) so when you have the money and the means and Marvel re-releases them or makes them available please buy them.

I highly rec the Nova stuff with Richard Rider since it kind of goes hand to hand with the stuff that happens in GotG and it also leads to Thanos Imperative (and then move on to Sam’s stuff when you’re done with it!) not to mention the Nova corps is in the movie.

Personally I didn’t really like Annihilators/Annihilators: Earthfall, IMO it’s only worth it because there’s a Rocket/Groot mini in there but other than that it wasn’t that great (and TBH it is very skippable).

I know next to nothing about GotG, so I’ll be reading all of this before the movie comes out.
mattfractionblog

thighhighs:

You’ve probably never heard of Jackie Ormes and that’s a goddamn tragedy. But it’s not surprising—there is no “Jackie Ormes Omnibus” available on Amazon.com, no “Collected Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger,” no “Essential Torchy Brown.” She won no awards, can be found in no hall of fame, and is usually treated as “an interesting find” by comic historians. She’s become a curio, a funny little facet of history, undiscovered, even, by today’s wave of geek-oriented feminism.

Jackie Ormes was the first African-American woman cartoonist. Yeah. That’s who we’re ignoring. Her work for the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender—both incredibly influential African-American newspapers—was utterly groundbreaking and remains unique, even in the context of modern comics. Her first work, Torchy Brown in Dixie to Harlem, featured the adventures of the titular Torchy, a stylish, intelligent young African-American woman who (feigning illiteracy) boards a whites-only train car to New York City and changes her life. Torchy’s story is a great, irreverent window into the migration of Southern-born African-Americans to the North, a movement that defined 20th-century America—but it is also the story of a girl on her own, living her own life and making her own choices. Torchy was an incredible aspirational figure, the likes of which barley exists in modern comics: an independent, optimistic, fashionable and adventurous black woman. Ormes would later revive Torchy’s story in Torchy in Heartbeats, a strip that introduced international adventure into the heroine’s life. In Heartbeats, Torchy traveled to South America, dated idealistic doctors, battled environmental exploitation and confronted racism at every turn. She was, frankly, awesome

And then there was Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger, her most successful and longest-running work. Patty-Jo ‘n’ Ginger was a single panel gag strip, like Family Circus—an illustration with a caption beneath it. Ginger was a beautiful, stylish young woman always accompanied by her little sister Patty-Jo, a clear-eyed, sardonic kid who spent most strips calling out the bullshit they endured on a daily basis as black women. Ormes’ talents shine through especially well in these little stories: her canny wit, the absolutely gorgeous clothes she drew her women in (seen also in her Torchy Togs paper dolls) and her skillful, succinct way of imparting to the reader just how goddamn stupid our society can be about gender and race. Patty-Jo is never shamed or taken down a peg for being an intelligent, outspoken little girl—in fact, she was made into a highly popular doll that wasn’t an obnoxious Topsy-style stereotype. She preceded Daria, Emily the Strange, Lian Harper, all those wry little girls we celebrate today—and yet, I see her on no t-shirts, can find her in no libraries. Patty-Jo is celebrated only in doll-collecting circles at this point, as the cute little symbol of a bygone age.

At Jackie Ormes’ height as a cartoonist, her work reached one million people per week. In the 1940s and 1950s, she reached one million people per week. She didn’t just surpass barriers—she leapt merrily over them. She introduced the general populace to a voice that had always existed, but was seldom heard—a voice that is still smothered today. She created African-American women who unapologetically enjoyed glamour, who pioneered their own futures, who refused to keep silent about the walls they found themselves scraping against every day. I haven’t even covered the half of it: Ormes was also an avid doll collector, served on the founding board of directors of the DuSable Museum of African-American history, and was targeted by the McCarthy-led witchhunts of the 1950s. Remember Jackie Ormes. Celebrate Jackie Ormes. Visit The Ormes Society and support the essential work they do. Keep her memory alive so that we may enjoy a million more Torchys and Patty-Jos in our comics—instead of the paltry handful we are offered today.

(First in a series on women in the comics industry.)

comicscodeauthority

actioncomics:

The DC vs Marvel debate only makes sense if you’re talking about it from a business standpoint. 

For example, Marvel has (recently) made better decisions regarding how to translate their characters to the silver screen compared to DC.

or

Marvel is innovating in a way that DC currently is not.

or 

DC, despite all controversy, is a pioneer for rebooting their entire line, and initial sales prove that this was a wise financial decision, one that Marvel has since psuedo-imitated.

The DC vs Marvel debate is childish if it boils down to:

DC sucks because Marvel is better or I prefer Marvel because DC sucks.

comicscodeauthority
actioncomics:

towritecomicsonherarms:

cannobeans:

towritecomicsonherarms:


I KNOW Marvel is better than DC. Has nothing to do with different universes at all. I just prefer the characters and writers and artists and events and stories.

So you don’t know, you just prefer.
And Marvel automatically loses points for letting Jeph Loeb write a book.

Rob Liefeld
DC loses all points and may god have mercy on their soul

Actually Liefeld has written comics for DC and Marvel. Loeb wrote one of the best Superman stories of all time and Liefeld created Deadpool so what are either of you talking about?

Each of these companies has gone through dark times of bad management, crappy creators, and lack of progressiveness. Just because you prefer one universe doesn’t mean it’s better than the other.

actioncomics:

towritecomicsonherarms:

cannobeans:

towritecomicsonherarms:

image

I KNOW Marvel is better than DC. Has nothing to do with different universes at all. I just prefer the characters and writers and artists and events and stories.

So you don’t know, you just prefer.

And Marvel automatically loses points for letting Jeph Loeb write a book.

Rob Liefeld

DC loses all points and may god have mercy on their soul

Actually Liefeld has written comics for DC and Marvel. Loeb wrote one of the best Superman stories of all time and Liefeld created Deadpool so what are either of you talking about?

Each of these companies has gone through dark times of bad management, crappy creators, and lack of progressiveness. Just because you prefer one universe doesn’t mean it’s better than the other.